31 Days of Feasting on Theology: Ontological Trinity

31 Days 2017 Large

Gentle Reader,

Ontological Trinity: Who God is. His nature, essence, attributes.

Related Concepts and/or Examples

Attributes of God – a place to begin

What Does the Bible Teach About the Trinity? – attempting to unravel a mystery

Trinitarian Blessings – from the Church of England

John Wesley and the Trinity – explores the thoughts and teachings from the founder of Methodism

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For all entries in the 31 Days of Feasting on Theology series, go here.

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31 Days of Feasting on Theology: Arian Controversy

31 Days 2017 Large

Gentle Reader,

Arian Controversy: Teaching first attributed to Arius (225 – 336 A.D.), a presbyter in Alexandria, Egypt. He (and others) claimed that Jesus was not eternal, and therefore was subordinate to the Father. Declared heretical at the Council of Nicea (325 A.D.)

Related Concepts and/or Examples

A Chronology of the Arian Controversy – for all you timeline lovers

Santa Claus Punched Arius – probably didn’t happen, but one of the great weird stories of the early church

Consubstantiality – Father, Son and Holy Spirit are of one substance (eternal in nature)

Athanasius – the great opponent of Arianism

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For all entries in the 31 Days of Feasting on Theology series, go here.

31 Days of Feasting on Theology: Creed

31 Days 2017 Large

Gentle Reader,

Creed: A (relatively) brief, formal statement of Christian doctrine.

Related Concepts and/or Examples

Apostles Creed – one of the earliest statements

Nicene Creed – written following the legalization of Christianity in the Roman Empire

Chalcedonian Defintion – defines and explains the nature of Christ

Filioque Controversy – an argument that’s still going on today

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For all entries in the 31 Days of Feasting on Theology series, go here.

Five Minute Friday: Invite

Along the Way @ mlsgregg.com

Gentle Reader,

No preamble. I’m nearly asleep.

Kate says: invite.

Go.

Sometimes you just have to break down and take the legal, prescribed narcotics.

I lay in bed Monday night, doing battle with the Witch-King of Angmar (second Tolkein shout out of the week; the image of an invisible nazgul stabbing me in the head is just the perfect way to describe this headache and I don’t care if you label me an ultra-nerd). The medication haze had descended but I was not yet sleeping. I inhabited that fuzzy, frothy place filled with pink elephants on parade. Then – BAM!

Genesis 21:31. Genesis 21:31. Genesis 21:31.

I said, out loud, “Yeah, okay,” and went to sleep.

Looked up the verse the next day. It reads:

Therefore he called that place Beersheba, because the two of them swore an oath there. (NKJV)

Sooooo….what?

I opened up my atlas and my commentaries. Searched the original Hebrew online. Read the context. Haven’t the slightest idea what it is that I’m supposed to glean here. I know the Holy Spirit dropped this into my mind, because it’s far too obscure and weird and disconnected from what I’m currently studying to be anything that I’d come up with. I’m sure this is the start of something, some lesson that I need to learn (or, potentially, relearn, because God is both patient and a perfectionist).

Why share this with you?

Because, dear reader, this month I’m writing about theology, and part of the pursuit of knowing God more deeply is understanding that we’ll never reach the bottom of His well. There’s always mystery. Always things that He knows that are beyond our grasp. The moment we take Christ’s hand, we are set on a never-ending journey (hence the title of this blog), with just enough light to take the next step. No doubt days, months or even years from now, some switch will flip in my head and I’ll think, “Ah, yes. That’s why I needed to know this verse.”

The mystery, God Himself, entices. He invites. He draws us inward and onward. Trust Him, little human. You cannot see the whole road, but you’ll always see exactly what you need to see, when you need to see it.

Stop.

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