31 Days of Feasting on Theology: Ekklesia

31 Days 2017 Large

Gentle Reader,

Ekklesia: Greek word commonly translated as “church.” A group of “called out” ones. The collection of diverse people belonging to the family of God, bought and adopted by the death and resurrection of Christ.

Related Concepts and/or Examples

Body of Christ – metaphor used to describe the church

Church – history and usage of the term

The Church Does not Replace Israel – differences between Replacement, Separation and Remnant views

Early Christian Prayers – provides insight into our our spiritual ancestors understood and worshiped the Lord

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For all entries in the 31 Days of Feasting on Theology series, go here.

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31 Days of Feasting on Theology: Apostolic Fathers

31 Days 2017 Large

Gentle Reader,

Apostolic Fathers: Church leaders who served in the first generation following the death of the Apostles. Includes: Clement of Rome, Ignatius of Antioch, Polycarp of Smyrna, Marcion, Justin Martyr, Ireneaus of Lyons, Clement of Alexandria, Tertullian.

Related Concepts and/or Examples

Didache – written teaching from this era

Shepherd of Hermas – also from this era

Church History 101 – easy-to-follow exploration

Life of Justin Martyr – brief biographical information

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For all entries in the 31 Days of Feasting on Theology series, go here.

31 Days of Feasting on Theology: Chesed

31 Days 2017 Large

Gentle Reader,

Chesed: Hebrew word for God’s loving kindness toward Israel. His loyal love and covenant faithfulness. Enduring and eternal.

Related Concepts and/or Examples

From Hesed to Agape – comparing and contrasting the Hebrew and Greek terms

Arminian Covenant Theology – an exploration of chesed and the covenant by Vic Reasoner

The Unconditional Love of God – short devotional reading

God is Kind – a selection of Bible verses

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For all entries in the 31 Days of Feasting on Theology series, go here.

31 Days of Feasting on Theology: Kenosis

31 Days 2017 Large

Gentle Reader,

Kenosis: Christ’s “self-emptying.” The external exchange by which He laid aside the “form of God” and took on the “form of man.” During the Incarnation, Jesus chose to operate within some of the limitations of humanity (i.e., He was not omnipresent).

Related Concepts and/or Examples

What Is the Kenosis? – a place to begin

A Consideration of the Christological Hymn of Philippians 2 – an old paper of mine that touches on kenosis

Kenosis – scholarly definition

Kenotic Theory – prominent views

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For all entries in the 31 Days of Feasting on Theology series, go here.