Stumbling Servants

Along the Way @ mlsgregg.com

Gentle Reader,

It is a privilege and a pleasure to serve, even in the chaotic and frustrating moments, because it is a privilege and a pleasure to do as Jesus did. It is an honor to be a vessel for His truth, grace and love.

Took an unplanned break last week. I joined my church family in a large community service project and just ran out of time and energy to sit and let the words flow.

There were some tough spots. I butted heads with people I love. It’s a rough-and-tumble and often dysfunctional family, this one that Christ has bought and created by the shedding of His blood. We’ve got sharp edges and soft spots and somehow always manage to ram our sharpness into another’s softness. Our ideas and ways of doing things don’t always align. Sometimes we get derailed in disagreement, forgetting what the goal really is.

That goal? To serve God by serving others. No strings attached.

This little family of faith to which I belong has had a bumpy year. We could have easily imploded over this event. Instead, as I reflect on the last month, I see a quiet, gentle work of God. We are in no way, shape or form perfect people. Far, far from it. But He used us. He prodded here and pushed there to move us beyond the sticking place. We learned some much-needed lessons. We pressed into some difficult conversations. In the end, we worked as a team – maybe a team that doesn’t always win the game, but a team that makes the plays.

Truth is: The people with whom I worship with week after week can frustrate me like no other. But isn’t that how it is with family? They drive you up the wall, but you love them. You don’t always understand the choices they make. You give them side-eye sometimes. But that love is never in question.

We know that God says we are His children. So I wonder if He looked upon us – sweaty and stumbling and maybe a little crabby – with the kind of expression that crosses a father’s face as he watches his toddler learn a new skill. It’s messy. It’s hard. But when that toddler finally makes progress, hair flying every which way and hands covered with peanut butter – the father beams.

There’s always those little spots in our minds, those unevangelized places, that don’t grasp and rest in the kind of love God has for us. We can recite the verses and say the right things. But there’s a part of us that remains scared. What if I don’t do this right? Holiness, sanctification, submission, obedience – all commanded, all Christ-enabled. Perfectionism? Not so much.

Meditate on this verse with me –

But God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us.

– Romans 5:8 (NKJV)

While we were still sinners.

The people with whom we, church folk, interacted at that event did not speak, behave or dress the ways we thought they should. They haven’t always made wise choices. They may have had addictions or come from chaotic, broken backgrounds.

Guess what?

They’re just like us.

Jesus didn’t require us to clean up our acts before He offered help.

Again, holiness gets a big “yes and thumbs up” from God. He doesn’t save us so that we can keep on doing whatever we want. We don’t get to bend the definition of sin or remove certain cherished activities from the category. That’s cheap grace. What Christ did for us certainly wasn’t cheap. It cost Him everything. Nor does He save us so that we can spend the rest of our lives under the tyranny of perfectionism. The Bible is full of stories of regular people who loved God but messed up – and God remained steady in His love for them.

Just like us.

We cannot hoard this treasure. The homeless, the addicted, the mentally ill, the sick, the broken – God loves them, just as He loves us. We don’t need to fear them. We need to listen to them, then tell them. Tell them of the God who made the stars, of the atom-splitting choice in a garden, of sin and struggle, of grace and resurrection.

Then we need to turn around and remind ourselves of these things.

Onward, stumbling servants. Get back up when you skin your knees. Resist the urge to retaliate with someone slaps your face. Seek forgiveness when you need and grant it when asked. Beg God for wisdom. Beg Him to make you gentle. Lace up your boots, gird your loins, roll up your sleeves.

We may not do it perfectly, but the work awaits.

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31 Days in the Quiet: Brownies

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Gentle Reader,

It’s no secret that I’m not a domestic diva. While I am a neat-freak and love to organize, I could do without grocery shopping, meal planning or cooking. (I could also do without paying bills. If anyone wants to give me lots of money, I won’t turn you down!)

Even as a kid, I hated these things. I would beg to stay home and do housework rather than walk the aisles of the grocery store with my parents. I’m not exactly sure why this is. Maybe I find all the choices overwhelming. And as to helping with meals? Let’s just say that I’ve been known to burn the unburnable and leave key ingredients out. I get bored when having to stand in front of a stove monitoring this or that concoction.

My reputation as a non-foodie is so deep that when joking with some of the ladies at church that I would need someone to feed me if my husband ever went on a business trip, they took me seriously. Chris himself has commented that, if I lived alone, I’d likely live on cold cereal and chocolate chips.

I am thus completely fine with the fact that Chris does most of the cooking, but today I made a connection. We had to go and sign some papers to finalize our house refinancing (praise God!), and he commented that he wasn’t feeling very good. I decided right then to make some from-scratch brownies, his favorite dessert. (I love having a husband who isn’t hard to please). As I melted chocolate chips and beat eggs into the flour, I sighed. This wasn’t really how I wanted to spend my time.

But then I imagined how Chris would smile when he came home and got to eat a decadent, chocolately chunk. That made me smile. And I thought, “That’s what serving is. It means looking past the inconvenience of the moment and into someone else’s happiness.” 

My journey to faith. (15)

 For all posts in the 31 Days in the Quiet series, go here.