Review: Here and Now

Gentle Reader,

Faith, in a Hellenistic, Western culture, is normally thought of as agreeing to creeds and catechisms. I do not mean to imply that orthodoxy is not important. It is. But let’s not favor orthodoxy, what we believe, to the extent that we neglect orthopraxy, how we act. When the religious leaders inquired about who their neighbor was, Jesus didn’t distribute a how-to manual for categorizing good and bad neighbors. He shared a story about what a neighbor “does.” He stops for an injured man, tends to his wounds, and he cares for his needs.

– p. 34

Here and Now: Thriving in the Kingdom of Heaven Today, by Robby Gallaty, is not an easy or quick read. It’s not that the book is difficult or overly academic; anyone can pick up this book at understand what Gallaty is saying. Here and Now is simply one of those books that you have to set aside for awhile, after reading a chapter or two, in order to process what you’re learning.

Consider:

[Jesus] referred to the kingdom as a present power that is ruling over one’s life, not in terms of a future place to wait for until after we die. A citizen of the kingdom follows the instructions of the king, a response that garners blessings, favor, and abundant life today.

– p. 93

There is a lot to unpack in those sentences, which Gallaty does well throughout the book. We who follow Christ are to be completely given over to the way of the kingdom. Our allegiance belongs to a country we cannot see, a country whose Rulers goes out of His way to break and transcends all ethnic, national, and socioeconomic boundaries. This allegiance does not guarantee health or wealth in this lifetime; Gallaty is careful to point out that those blessings, favor, and abundant life have nothing to do with a fat bank account, material possessions, or physical well-being, and everything to do with a life overflowing with the joy and purpose found in an intimate relationship with the King.

Gallaty begins by grounding the teaching on the Kingdom, so central to earthly ministry of Jesus, in the soil of first-century Judea. He discusses the importance of the Temple as the resting place of God’s presence, and why it was (and remains) so radical that the death and resurrection of Jesus made “the Temple…mobile as the people of God became the church. They were not restricted to a particular location any longer” (p. 44). The Kingdom of God was never meant to settle in a certain place, confined to a certain people. It is designed to spread and grow, encompassing the whole earth, and all peoples therein.

A “subject” has multiple roles as a kingdom citizen, not the least of which is representing the crown everywhere they go. Each person is an image bearer or witness to the monarchy, and with great privilege comes great responsibility.

Similarly, Jesus envisioned this citizenry when He pronounced the kingdom as come. The kingdom messaged seasoned His sermons. The Gospel writers went to great lengths to ensure their readers understood this truth.

– p. 79

Whether highly visible or hidden in our daily lives, we represent the Kingdom of God. We do not have the luxury of sliding through the hours, content in complacency and laziness. We do not get to turn off our minds and accept whatever our preferred news sources tell us about the world. We do not get to decide who is worthy of grace and love. We do not have permission to cast anyone as “other” when we know that they are made in God’s image, just as we are.

In short, our faith must mean something, right now, today.

Christians, at the moment of salvation, become citizens of Heaven while still holding passports on earth. That is precisely why Peter urges Christians “as strangers and exiles to abstain from sinful desires that wage war against the soul (1 Peter 2:11). Our identity influences our activity. A passport is required to travel out of the country you have citizenship in. The stamp on your passport upon entering a foreign country is a reminder that you don’t live there. As a visitor, you’re just passing through.

– p. 125

Here and Now will step on your toes. Stomp on them, in fact. But we could all do with a good, holy bruising from time to time. Go out and get this book. Take your time reading it. Allow the message to soak into your soul. You won’t regret growing in your understanding of and relationship with God, despite the pains.

I RECEIVED A FREE COPY OF THIS BOOK IN EXCHANGE FOR MY FAIR AND HONEST REVIEW.